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fellini koolinis

Chardonnay Revival 3 Stories

Chardonnay Revival 3 Stories

The last decade or so chardonnay has lost its’ lustre as the “go to”
white in North America. There has even been a snarling attack by wine
snobs on the alleged mediocrity of the grape –with its’ own caustic
acronym: ABC (Anything But Chardonnay)
Pinot Grigio to some extent has knocked chardonnay off its’s top
leaderboard position but wine lovers are also discovering and learning
to experiment with other unique white grape varieties.

That’s a good thing. However there is much to be celebrated if you take
the time to revisit the diversity of styles available in chardonnays from

different international terroirs.

Macon Lugny Bouchard Pere & Fils Burgundy $16.00

A real bargain for a white burgundy from a reputable House. You can
taste the chalky terroir with intense fruit and a nose of apples and
biscuits. I paired it with some raw Malpeque Oysters -perfect.
Chardonnay Cave Spring Niagara VQA $16.00

A terrific chardonnay made from 25 year old vines in Niagara. Soft
peach and pear flavours with the scent of vanilla. Served by the glass at
Fellinis. I matched it with a slab of grilled swordfish with a lemon caper

butter…delicious.

Kendell Jackson Vintner’s Reserve Sonoma County $19.95
This rich and exotic blockbuster - in your face. Beautifully balanced
though. I drank it with a big fatty centre cut pork chop from Farm Boy

with a mango chutney on the side. That worked!

Note: Word to the wise:

Macon Lugny and Kendell Jackson are currently $2 off at the LCBO.

 

Malivoire Gamay vs Cru Beaujolais

Malivoire Gamay vs Cru Beaujolais

This time of year brings thoughts of Vendage and the grape harvest in Beaujolais in the Burgundian vineyards of France. While the celebration of Beaujolais Nouveau has lost its’ lustre as a marketing juggernaut it still remains the most famous celebration of grape picking and early fermentation in the world.

The grape in question is Gamay and in Burgundy the top Beaujolais are represented by 10 “Crus” “or designated wine growing regions. Each one has a distinctive character based on its’s terroir and the skills and stylistic intentions of the winemakers.

The Niagara wine region in Ontario in its own young grape growing history has always cultivated the grapes of Burgundy: Chardonnay, Aligote, Pinot Noir and Gamay.

I thought it would be interesting to compare a locally grown Gamay from our wine list with the best: A Cru Beaujolais. In this case I chose as our candidates for a blind tasting comparison a Gamay from Malivoire in Niagara and a Cru Beaujolais- a Brouilly from the “King of Beaujolais” winemaker Georges Dubouef.

I drafted my Saturday night serving crew for the tasting.

I chose a Brouilly as my Beaujolais example because it is somewhere in the middle of the 10 Crus in terms of body, power and flavour.

The typical flavour profile of a Cru Beaujolais is this:

Light to medium bodied, fragrant, nose of cranberries, raspberries, and violets with a touch of that unmistakeable Burgundian earthy nose.

Well in terms of preferences the taste contest turned out to be a tie.

My preference was actually the Brouilly-a bit denser, and darker but the mere fact that a Niagara Gamay held its’ own against a Beaujolais Cru is worth noting.

Also the bottle of Malivoire was 3 dollars cheaper ($15.00) than the Brouilly .

Do not be afraid to chill your Gamay or Beaujolais for 20 minutes to bring out the flavours.

Follow this link for more information about Cru Beaujolais.

A Spring Gem from the Loire Valley

A Spring Gem from the Loire Valley

If this Blog were to have a Mission Statement (well it does now) it would be to share little wine discoveries past and present. Sometimes when you veer off the beaten path of your wine comfort zone you find a little gem. Safe to say when we think of the classic wine regions of France Bordeaux, Burgundy and the Cotes du Rhone are foremost in our thoughts. But the unofficial Vin de Pays wines that French consumers are drawn to say in the bistros of Paris are more than likely to come from the Loire Valley. Why? Because the Loire is home to some of France’s best well-made value wines red and white. Yes the Loire is renowned for some iconic whites that are on the expensive side such as (Sancerre, Pouilly Fume-made from Sauvignon Blanc grapes and Savenierres made from Chenin Blanc grapes. For the value conscious consumer look for reds from Bourgueil and Chinon-made from Cabernet Franc grapes (Cabernet Sauvignon’s more visceral cousin).

But the bottle that kick started this piece was at terrific little wine from a sub region of a sub region in the Loire called Saumur. It is made from Chenin Blanc grapes and has lovely nuances of quince, chamomile, honey, cream and citrus.

Nice fruit with a crisp dry finish.

It is called Moulins de Turquant about $18.00 in the Vintages section of the LCBO. It’s a real authentic taste of France from an off the beaten path part of France.